1001 Plots / Places / NPCs / etc. for western adventures...

All discussions about the Weird West setting for Savage Worlds. If specific to another system, please note in the subject line, [Classic], [d20], or [Protocol].

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Turanil
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#21 Postby Turanil » Fri Jun 09, 2006 8:32 am

Ah! This really weird adventure seed, directly inspired from some old pulp stories, may not appeal to everybody. I am not even sure, that as a GM/Marshall I would want to run that... :roll: However, I thought I should nonetheless share it with you... :lol:

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SIX-GUN BIGFOOT

-- Years ago, a solitary gold prospector by the name of Johnson found a baby big-foot whose mother was dead. He called him O'Neil and raised him as his own son, teaching him to dig for gold, haul wood and water and, more important, how to shoot a pistol. However, one day as O'Neil was away in the mountains, Johnson was killed for failing to reveal the location of a huge vein of gold to bandits. When O'Neil the big-foot came back, the bandits were far away. Nonetheless, the keen olfactive sense of O'Neil allowed him to smell what remained of the bandits' stench. So, the big-foot strapped a brace of six-shooters, and he went on to track the killers across the wilds of Colorado, bumping them off one by one...

-- The posse is at a trading post near the mountains. They hear about some wild facts and rumors: Lately some men have been found dead, their chest shot by what must have been a small canon or really big rifle (in fact, the oversized O'Neil guns especially designed to fit in his big meaty hands). But worse, their head had been ripped apart from the body and brought away by who-knows-who. Furthermore, large tracks of strange bare feet have often been found in the vicinity of the cadavers, and an old drunkard pretends to have seen a huge furred humanoid near the trading post a few weeks ago. Unknow to all, this was of course O'Neil who was tracking the bandits who happened to have split and went on their own ways. O'Neil had taken much time to track them down and get them one by one. Still, one of the bandits remains...

-- Then, the posse meet with Franck Hogle, a stinking prospector... or so he says (i.e.: to be a prospector, not to be stinking, as he actually smell bad). One of the victims was his brother, and Hogle "wants to know the truth" about his grisly death. But the real truth is: all the men who have been found dead with their head missing, were the bandits who killed Johnson. Hogle was their leader, and the last bandit to remain alive. Hogle pretends that his brother had a map of the gold mine which he and him had discovered, and that the atrocious assassin has stolen the map and disguised the crime as something weird and unnatural to mislead investigators. Yet there never was any gold map, and Hogle refers to Johnson's mine that he only vaguely knows about. Hogle absolutely doesn't know about O'Neil the bigfoot; he rather believes that Jensen, another desperado, is behind this. So, Hogle, who has no money left, tries to convince the posse to help him and investigate the murders.

-- Soon, it will be Hogle's turn to be killed by the big-foot. However, if the bandit is accompanied by the posse, O'Neil will wait until an opportunity presents itself (O'Neil doesn't want to involve other people in this vengeance, he wants to meet with the bandits alone and face to face). In any case, the posse should eventually find the tracks of the big-foot, especially as winter is approaching and the first snow are falling. This will lead them to Johnson's gold mine, where O'Neil buried his adoptive father, and hung the bandits heads on the wall. O'Neil won't attack the posse unless forced to (such as having to defend his life). He understands English, but doesn't read nor speak it. When trying to speak, the big-foot emits loud high pitched shrieks.

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:jack: [Pulp Fiction] <...> there was never a hero quite like the Six-Gun Gorilla. His name was O'Neil and he was a real gorilla, trapped in Africa as a baby, brought to the States and sold to a prospector named Johnson. O'Neil's adventures appeared in the magazine Adventure and Wizard, probably in 1926.

Johnson was a kindly gent who taught his protege to dig for gold, haul wood and water and, in an act that would forever change the concept of the Wild West, how to shoot a pistol. When Johnson is killed for failing to reveal the location of a huge vein of gold, O'Neil goes after the villains.

Strapping on a brace of six-shooters, the ape tracks the killers across the wilds of Colorado, bumping them off one by one — and highjacking a stagecoach now and again for transportation, and one assumes enough money to purchase a few bananas. Six-Gun Gorilla was pulp fiction at either its nadir or its apogee, your call. Either way it provided a moral applicable today. "Be careful of whom you monkey around with." :jack:


:1winknudge:

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#22 Postby Turanil » Sat Jun 10, 2006 8:05 am

One difficult thing is to come up with adventure plots that don't involve the supernatural. Here is one:

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THE HORSE RACE

-- Bart Hogan is a cunning and deceiving entrepreneur. During his travels he managed to find two pairs of twin brothers whom he convinced to work with him. Today, the scam will involve a great horse race across the desert. There is a hefty reward for the winners, and of course there will be much money to gain in making clever bets. However, all of the money is almost certain to go into Hogan's pockets, since this is not going to be a fair race... The race will involve small groups of contestants (so the posse may participate as such one of these groups), including two stupid looking dudes who may not possibly have the slightest chance of winning. The latter are of course Hogan's associates, upon whom the charlatan will bet all of his money. At some point when they are behind everybody, the pair will discreetly leave the race, while their brothers will enter it much farther away and thus easily win. Hehehe...

-- The race will go across forested hills, through different types of terrains, and very important, different paths to choose from at various points. There will be a canyon to cross, with the only bridge being unsafe and making the trip longer; there will be some valleys, one of them with a small lake and large river difficult to go through; at some points is an enraged grizzly or maybe a pack of hungry wolves to fight; during the race the posse may encounter another group of contestants willing to use guns to get rid of competitors; etc.

-- The race should take almost a week to complete. It should involve strategic thinking (determination of which best paths to take), varied skill uses, and a sprinkling of fights. Lastly, there should be a few clues (provided the posse investigates) about the strangeness of the two most stupid and inept looking contestants being those who won the race.

-- For some change in most DL:R campaigns, there shouldn't be anything supernatural featured in this adventure.

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Re: 1001 Plots / Places / NPCs / etc. for western adventures

#23 Postby dap6000 » Sat Jun 10, 2006 11:01 am

Turanil wrote:I feel somewhat at a loss when it comes to a western rpg... :oops: :cry:


:o

Based on the rest of this thread, I'd say it really looks like you have trouble coming up with ideas. :roll:

:P

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Day of the Locusts

#24 Postby MadDrJeffe » Sat Jun 10, 2006 7:17 pm

Day of the locusts
(background 1874 was a terrible year for famers in the west as scores of locusts descended from the skies and ate everything they could) I liked the idea of having the PC's deal with the occasional baddies that arent cult related. Anyhow I hope yall like it.

-- Relaxing at the Moody homestead on the way to Dodge city the sky in the distance goes dark even though moments before there wasn't a cloud in the sky. Keen eyed heros can make out silver shapes darting and flitting through the sky. Locusts!

-- Pa Moody, begs for the PC's help in saving his wheat crop.

-- The PC's and 6 extras fan out in the 24 x 24 wheat field with lanterns, picks and shovels (and whatever mojo PC's can work) and have to deal with 3 locust swarms... that can come pretty much however the GM wants them.

If the swarm lands in a part of the field it strips it bare in 3 rounds, unless the PC's can do enough damage to the swarm to stop it. Shaken swarms do not spend the round eating.

If the PCs manage to : Kill 2 of the 3 swarms, the third one takes wing and moves on back in the direction it came from (an odd occurance)

If the PC's dont manage to kill the swarms, they will eat everything, down to the curtains on the homestead windows, leather saddles, axe handles and everything out in the open they can get to and then fly off back in the direction they came from. Even if the PC's arent able to stop the swarm, Pa Moody looking broken thanks them for their help.

-- Talking later to a few of the Moody children revelas that there have been a lot of locust attacks on farms lately, and a lot of dust storms and that they always seem to come from out of the west and go back that way. Young Robert thinks they seem to be coming from grave creek, a small waterway that meanders through the hills about 5 miles west of the homestead.

-- A local indian, known as Crazy Mule tells the PCs a story about a malevolant spirit that has taken residence in the area. One thats so greedy it wont let any living creature eat.

-- PCs wanting to investigate the area find that the land closer to the creek is stripped bare of everything, they even come across the skeletons of a herd of antelope stripped clean on all flesh.

If they succeed in their investigation roll they find a cave, in a hollow cut above the creek, where a gigantic Locust Queen is laying thousands of thousands of eggs. She attacks the PC's with 1 more swarm of locusts.
and 3 young tunnel critters (replace burrowing with flying)
Treat the Locust queen as an Elder Tunnel Critter but replace Burrowing with flying.

If the Heros win the locusts attack stop, and the happy locals throw a big hootenanny in their honor. They can afford 40 bucks a person if the PC's demand a reward. But the mood will be somewhat less jovial. They cheerfully offer the PC's any basic food or supplies they need though.

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Re: 1001 Plots / Places / NPCs / etc. for western adventures

#25 Postby Turanil » Sun Jun 11, 2006 5:52 am

dap6000 wrote:Based on the rest of this thread, I'd say it really looks like you have trouble coming up with ideas. :roll:

Well, it was the case when I first got the DL:R book and began to read it. Since then I have commited my mind trying to find ideas that would fit with a western ambiance, and will continue for some time until I have enough ideas I like for a campaign. I am trying to come up with ideas that really have an Old West feel, not plots that could be used in any genre, especially sword and sorcery.

In any case thanks to those who also contribute their own. It helps to get other gamers' point of view on the subject. Keep them coming! :)

Also to note: the "Old West Resource" post (11th post on the 1st page of the thread) has been updated with more links. I continue to add URLs whenever I find new ones that look interesting.

Thanks.

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#26 Postby Turanil » Sun Jun 11, 2006 11:09 am

Gold/Silver/Copper/Diamond/etc. mines, but also Coal mines, and of course Ghost Rock mines, will probably be a common feature of DL:R campaigns. At least, several adventure ideas presented in this thread involve them. As such, this post is going to gather information on mines (copypaste from the Internet), that could be of use in the game. I will probably update this post as I find more info on the subject. :)

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Using Mines in DL:R for Dungeon Crawling


:jack: MINES' DANGERS & HAZARDS

Shafts (falling through):
The Collar or top of a mine shaft is especially dangerous. The fall down a deep shaft is just as lethal as the fall from a tall building with the added disadvantage of bouncing from wall to wall in a shaft and the likelihood of having falling rocks and timbers for company. Even if a person survived such a fall, it may be impossible to climb back out. The rock at the surface is often decomposed. Timbers may be rotten or missing. So it is dangerous to walk anywhere near a shaft opening, the whole area is often ready and waiting to slide into the shaft along with the curious. A shaft sunk from a tunnel is called a winze. In many old mines winzes have been boarded over. If these boards have decayed, a perfect trap is waiting.

Ladders:
Ladders in most abandoned mines are unsafe. Ladder rungs are missing or broken. Some will fail under the weight of a child because of dry rot. Vertical ladders are particularly dangerous.

Water:
Many tunnels have water standing in deep pools or concealing holes in the floor. Pools of water also ware common at the bottom of shafts. It is usually impossible to estimate the depth of the water, and a false step could lead to drowning.

Cave-Ins:
Cave-ins are an obvious danger. Areas that are likely to cave often are hard to detect. Minor disturbances, such as vibrations caused by walking or speaking, may cause a cave-in. If a person is caught he can be crushed to death. A less cheerful possibility is to be trapped behind a cave-in without anyone knowing you are there. Death may come through starvation, thirst, or gradual suffocation.

Timber:
The Timber in abandoned mines can be weak from decay. Other timber, although apparently in good condition, may become loose and fall at the slightest touch. A well timbered mine opening can look very solid when in fact the timber can barely support its own weight. There is constant danger of inadvertently touching a timber and causing the tunnel to collapse. In any case, the cribbage and cribbing that holds up the wood that holds up the top of the mine is creaking constantly under the tremendous weight, a thousand feet of earth and rock and stone right above you. Then, add to this that every day miners are dynamiting underneath that mountain of rock...

Bad Air / Poisonous Gas:
"Bad Air" contains poisonous gases or insufficient oxygen. Poisonous gases can accumulate in low areas or along the floor. A person may enter such areas breathing the good air above the gases but the motion caused by walking will mix the gases with the good air, producing a possibly lethal mixture for him to breathe on the return trip. Because little effort is required to go down a ladder, the effects of "Bad Air" may not be noticed, but when climbing out of a shaft a person requires more oxygen and will breathe more deeply. The result is dizziness, followed by unconsciousness. If the gas doesn't kill, the fall will. Otherwise, note that the repeated inhalation of coal dust over extended periods of time can result in serious health problems, as, for example, anthracosis (commonly called black lung disease).

Flammable Gas (coal mines):
This happens primarily in coal mines, but could also be a feature of Ghost Rock mines. Sometimes flammable gases (such as methane) are trapped in coal beds, and are released during mining operations. With the use of oil lamps and torches, it's easy to accidentally ignite such gases... and die burned and buried.

Explosives (dynamite):
Many abandoned mines contain old explosives left by previous workers. This is extremely dangerous! Explosives should never be handled by anyone not thoroughly familiar with them. Even experienced miners hesitate to handle old explosives. Old dynamite sticks and caps can explode if stepped on or just touched.

Rattlesnakes:
Old mine tunnels and shafts are among their favorite haunts to cool off in summer, or to search for rodents and other small animals. Any hole or ledge, especially near the mouth of the tunnel or shaft, can conceal a snake.

Pollution:
Coal mines and coal-preparation plants caused much environmental damage in the past. Surface areas exposed during mining, as well as coal and rock waste (which were often dumped indiscriminately), weathered rapidly, producing abundant sediment and soluble chemical products such as sulfuric acid and iron sulfates. Nearby streams became clogged with sediment, iron oxides stained rocks, and "acid mine drainage" caused marked reductions in the numbers of plants and animals living in the vicinity. Potentially toxic elements, leached from the exposed coal and adjacent rocks, were released into the environment. [Acid pools in old mines baby! :twisted: ]

Dealing with Danger:
-- No daylight reached this far [deep in the mine] so miners worked by candle light, but dangerous, explosive gases seeped from the rock and if they collected in one place (a pocket), the candle flame could cause an explosion.
-- Even if there was no explosion, the gas was poisonous and could choke the miners to death.
-- Engineers tried to clear the gases by ventilation, making fresh air flow through the workings to carry the gases away.
-- Young "trappers" had to open and close trap doors that sealed the tunnels to control the gas and fresh air flow. Sometimes fires were burned at the bottoms of shafts so that the heated air was drawn out of the pit. There was a danger that this fire could cause an explosion. Furnaces were built at the top of shafts to do the job more safely.
-- Scientists and inventors designed special lanterns, or Safety Lamps. Where possible however, candles were still used because they were cheaper.


:jack: MINING OPERATIONS

Hardrock mining entails diging into solid rock to fine minerals usually in their ore form (the metal plus oxygen). To do this, miners used picks and shovels, rock drills, dynamite and more. Miners dug either shafts that went straight down to follow ore bodies and veins, or tunnels which went somewhat horizontal into rock faces. Shafts usually had some sort of headframe (pictured left) standing above them to support the hoists. Shafts and tunnels were often supported with large timbers to prevent cave-ins. Most shaft or tunnel mines would eventually flood as they hit the water table and water would have to be continually pumped out. Sometimes there was so much water they had to abandon the mines.

:?: Types of Hard Rock Mines (by Todd Underwood)

Tunnels:
Hard rock mines usually fall into one of two categories, tunnels or shafts. Each involves digging and blasting deep into the bowels of the earth. Tunnel hard rock mines begin at the earth's surface and continue horizontally into the rock. Tunnels can extend for miles as they follow the ore. Most tunnels have many side tunnels, or even shafts that are sunk far back in the tunnel. These shafts are called winzes. Exploring Tunnel mines is very dangerous as it its dark and very difficult to see winzes. Many tunnels go back so far into the earth they tap into some of the earth's geothermal resources filling with gas that is toxic to humans. There is also the danger of cave-ins in old shafts that are no longer supported by the rotting wood timbers.

Shafts:
A shaft is a whole in the earth that is dug relatively straight down. Shafts usually have some sort of headframe or large wooden or metal structure at the top of the shaft to support a hoist. Hoists are used to lower men and machinery into the mine and to haul ore out. Many shafts have tunnels dug at different depths throughout the shaft. Getting too close to the side of an abandoned shaft can spell almost certain death. Many of the shafts extend thousands of feet into the earth.

:?: Extracting the Ore (by Todd Underwood)

The Pick and Shovel Method:
The most simple and inexpensive way of extracting ore for the early miners was the Pick and Shovel method. Miners would swing picks into the rock, slowly breaking it apart. Once enough rock had been removed, it would be shoveled away to be assayed or milled. The pick and shovel method was about the slowest way to extract ore for the miners and prospectors. It also took a lot of strength and would tire them out very quickly. Almost all of the major ore discoveries were done using this method.

Rock Drilling:
As technololy advanced, and the need for more efficient methods of extracting rock prevailed, miners starting drilling the rock with rock drills (pictured left). Once an ore body was disovered, people would move in immediately creating a small town. Equipment and machinery was brought in to start large mining operations. Among this machinery were large steam boilers to power air compressors. These compressors would be used to power the pneumatic (air powered) rock drills. The rock drills looked something like the modern jack hammer and hard very hard bits (pictured right) on the end. Rock drilling was a much faster and more efficient way to extract ore than the pick and shovel method. Sometimes, rock drills would be used to make holes in rock face into which dynamite or other explosives were placed.

Core Sampling:
Core sampling was done to test or assay the value of a particular area of rock without having to go through the trouble of removing the whole area. Core samplers would be drilled into a rock face and would extract a small core sample. This core sample would usually be a few inches in diameter and up to a few feet long. The core sampler could drill deep into the rock face without having to removed the whole area of rock. Core samples would then be assayed to determine the feasibility of mining in that particular area.

:?: Powering The Mines (by Todd Underwood)

Steam Engines:
In the early days and in small operations, simple mule and man power was used for everything. As technology advanced, and operations became larger, the steam engine was introduced. A steam engine consisted of a large boiler. The boiler (pictured here) was a very large cylindrical metal chamber in which steam was produced. Most boilers have either fire tubes or water tubes on the inside of the chamber. Either water was forced through these tubes (pictured below) and the rest of the chamber was filled with "fire" or water filled the chamber and the tubes were filled with the "fire". Wood, coal or coke was used to produce the "fire" or heat that was in turn used to turn the water to steam. From the boiler, the steam went to a cylinder much like a modern gasoline powered car's cylinders. Under pressure, steam forced its way into the cylinder depressing the piston. As the piston was depressed, it turned a crankshaft which could be used to power a hoist, air compressors or pumps.

Water(Hydro) Power:
Wherever possible, water or hydro power was used. If the location of the milling site was near any kind of sizeable reliable moving water, a water wheel would be used to generate power. This water wheel would have many paddles on it and would be partially submerged in moving water. As the water flowed, it would cause the wheel to turn. The wheel was then connected to whatever was needed to be powered.

:?: Transporting the Ore (by Todd Underwood)

From the Mine to the Outside World:
Once the ore was broken off the rock faces inside the mine, the chunks were shoveled into a transportation system to get it to the outside. If the mine was a shaft mine, the ore was shoveled into an ore bucket which was hauled up to the top of the mine by a winch. This winch or hoist was usually powered by the steam or diesel engines and was also used to get the miners and other equipment in and out of the mines. If the mine was a tunnel mine, the ore was shoveled into an ore car that ran on small train like track. The ore car was pulled on these tracks all the way out of the mine.

From the Mouth of the Mine to the Mill:
Once the ore was at the mine entrance, it was transported to a mill for milling. The type of transportation used here depended on how far the mill was. Many mines had mills in the same town that were nearby the mine making transportation easy. Most of the time, ore was deposited into an ore chute that held tons of ore waiting to be processed. From this chute, the mill which was usually located below the chute to take advantage of gravity, took as much ore per hour as it could process. Sometimes the mines were located on steep cliffs or near the tops of mountains. In these cases, an aerial tramway system was developed, much like a modern ski lift. The only difference is instead of carrying skiers on a seat the tramway carried ore in giant ore buckets. If the mill was located in another city or state, the ore was loaded onto sturdy wagons for transportation.

From the Mill on:
Most mills were not able to concentrate the ore completely to the free metal. In other words, most mills located at the mines and townsites were not able to put a rock in one end and have a gold ingot come out the other. Their job was simply to concentrate the ore enough to save on the shipping. If the ore coming out of the mill was ten times more concentrated than the ore going in, then one wagon load of the processed ore would be equal to 10 wagon loads of the unprocessed ore. This could greatly reduce the riskiness and difficulty of shipping the ore as the ore wagons were a favorite of bandits.

:?: Milling the Ore (by Todd Underwood)

Arrastras:
When a full size stamp mill was not available, arrastras were used to crush the ore. Arrastras were small circular flat areas of land usually about 10-20 feet in diameter with a pole in the center. Attached to the pole was a rod or line running out to a large heavy wheel. A horse or mule was usually attached to the end of the wheel area and would walk around in circles. As the animal walked, the heavy wheel would crush the ore underneath it. Arrastras were a crude way to crush large pieces of rock into much smaller and more manageable sized bits. In later years, iron arrastras (pictured on the right) replaced the wheel method.

Stamp Mills:
Stamp Mills were far more advanced than the early arrastras although they both performed the same function. Stamp mills ranged from one stamp on up to twenty or even fifty stamps all operating together. Each stamp was a large piece of solid iron or other metals attached to a long shaft. These shafts were usually attached to a cam with the other stamps if there were more than one. This cam had usually had a wheel on its end that was driven by a belt system. A steam engine was usually used to turn this wheel which lifted the stamps and dropped them with all their weight on the rocks that were to be crushed. Stamp mills would run 24 hours a day and as one can imagine, are extremely loud. They also tend to shake the ground as they are dropped which can make it feel like there is a continuous earthquake.

:?: Glossary

ADIT: A horizontal or nearly horizontal entrance to a mine, otherwise known as a tunnel.
ARRASTRA: A Spanish word for a circular rock-crushing device usually powered by a mule.
ASSAY: Measuring proportion of gold or silver content in ore.
CLAIM: A legal document stating the boundries of a proposed mining excavation.
DREDGE: A mining process by which sand in a river bed or stream is scooped up from the bottom and minerals are extracted.
FLOAT: Fragments of ore that had broken off a main vein to become buried rock outcropping.
HEADFRAME: The vertical apparatus over a mine shaft that has cables to be lowered down the shaft for the raising and lowering of ore and men.
HIGH GRADING: A method perfected by miners for carrying off rich ore from the mines and selling it themselves.
HYDRAULIC MINING: A process of washing ore from its bed with powerfull jets of water.
JUMPING A CLAIM: A method of taking over a good mining claim after it had already been staked out by someone else.
MILL: A building in which rock is crushed in order to extricate minerals. Mills are usually constructed on the side of hills and are gravity fed. This leads to the stairstep foundations one can usually see.
MOTHER LODE: The main or primary deposit or vein of a given mineral.
NUGGET: A lump of native or pure gold found in deposits and placer mines.
PLACER: A waterborne deposit of sand or gravel containing heavier minerals like gold that have been eroded from their original bedrock and concentrated as small particles that can be washed out.
PLATTING: Planning or mapping a townsite.
SHAFT: A vertical or nearly vertical opening into the Earth's surface.
SLUICE: an inclined trough, usually made of wood, for washing gold ore. The flow of the water is regulated by flood gates.
SMELTER: A building or complex in which material is melted to be separated from impurities.
STAMP MILL: A machine that crushes rock by means of a big heavy stamp that falls on the rock.
TAILINGS: Waste or refuse left after milling is complete, sometimes referred to as waste dumps.
WASTE DUMP: Waste rock that comes out of a mine.
WINZE: A shaft sunk from an adit.

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#27 Postby Turanil » Sun Jun 11, 2006 2:31 pm

OF MEN AND MONEY...

In the movie "For a Few Dollars More", some bandit is wanted for 2000$, which, according to the local sheriff, represents two years worth of his salary. So it appears that a sheriff would earn approximately 55$ per month, which seems to fit with the following income figures:

JohnnyBee wrote:These are all from "The Writer's Guide to Everyday Life in the Wild West", by Candy Vyvey Moulton, available through Amazon:

Assayer (month) $30
Bartender (month) $35
Blacksmith (month) $30
Carpenter (month) $30
Cowboy/ranch hand (month) $25
Demolitions expert (month) $50
Engineer (month) $40
Gunsmith (month) $30
Horse trainer (month) $30
Justice of the Peace (month) $50
Prison guard (month) $25
Ranch foreman (month) $45
Saloon gal (month) $15
Surveyor (month) $35
Teamster (month) $40
Telegraph operator (month) $30
Undertaker (month) $40
US army scout (civilian, month) $50
US army soldier (month) $25
Wait staff (month) $12


Now back on outlaws' rewards, searching the net I found that Billy the Kid, "the most famous outlaw", was searched for 500$, and that reward was issued by a governor. It looks like a more reasonable reward, compared to everyday life people's income. But now, googling further I found that the James brothers (who had killed 21 men and stolen more than half a million of dollars), were wanted for 9,000$ each (offered collectively by the States of Missouri and Kansas and the U. S. Post Office). By the way, the first robbery of the James gang committed against a bank, got them 57,000$, that could make a good figure of what bandits and outlaws may get from bank robbery in DL:R.

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#28 Postby Cheyenne Wright » Sun Jun 11, 2006 9:54 pm

The "Reward"

During the inevitable, weekly bar fight, one of the heroes is forced to shoot a man down down after he pulled a gun. When the local law shows up they tell the shooter that the man they killed, was a wanted gunslinger and gives them a whopping $1000 reward.

... but, then he warns them that the gunslinger had a rep a mile wide. "Folks used to come from all over to try and prove that they were better them him". adding "It’s a good thing you got him on an off night".

Not long after this -- fame seeking gunslingers start cropping up to try their hand against the man that took down the "fastest gun in the west".

Code: Select all

everytime the posse enters a new town, and the lucky hero's name gets mentioned -- pull a card.
On a face card or higher, someone trys to 'call him out'


After two or three showdowns, the posse lerns that the ‘lucky’ gringo has earned himself the same $1000 bounty on his head.
It’s a sure bet that folks won’t even bother trying to call him out any more – Now they’ll they just jump him…

Better learn to sleep with them guns.
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Arcanetimes.com The Art of Cheyenne Wright

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#29 Postby Cheyenne Wright » Sun Jun 11, 2006 10:02 pm

Blood Money

A woman comes to the posse with a job offer.

Her brother is wanted for a Train Robbery. She says that she loves her brother but that he is a mean and cold blooded killer. She even shows proof that after the hijacking, he killed the crew that helped him, so he didn't need to split the take.

She says that she can lead the posse to him, and they can keep the reward ($500 dead or alive). All she asks is that they promise NOT to kill him and keep her involvement out of it.

The Twist -- The man is guilty -- but no more or less than the woman that has hired them. Both had worked the hijacking together, and it was her idea to kill the loose lipped goons that they hired for the job.

She wants him out of the way so she can keep the substantial pay-off for herself.
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#30 Postby Turanil » Mon Jun 12, 2006 3:42 pm

Here is one involving Indians...

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THE SACRED BUFFALO'S SKULL

-- The Indian nations have been on the war path lately. First there was some turmoil and fights between enemy tribes, and now some groups of Indian braves are aggressively raiding the countryside, attacking and burning isolated ranches, etc. In fact, the posse could even be under Indian attack (preferably in a train), shortly before arriving at Fort Wallace, where many people have taken refuge.

-- The posse is told that they shouldn't go further along their way, because ahead has become too dangerous. Then, a hanging judge arrives, accompanied by an old Indian shaman. Everybody believes that the judge captured an Indian leader and intends to put him to trial. However, it's the shaman himself who sought the judge to help him put an end to the current turmoil. The shaman explains that some renegade Indian stole a buffalo skull most sacred to his people, a religious relic, and tries to use it to become the great chief and declare war on the white people. The shaman would have sent braves to retrieve it, but in a vision he was informed it would be better to call upon a white lawman to settle things. And for one thing, the skull having no significance to white people anyway, they wouldn't be tempted to keep it for themselves. At least, this is what the shaman says to strongly believe in. Now, the hanging judge agreed to help the shaman, thinking it can help stop the impending war, but doesn't want to venture alone in those troubled regions. Since the fort's soldiers are occupied defending the refugees, only remains the posse to go along with the pair...

-- The hidden hideous truth now. :twisted: The shaman is a most evil sorcerer who got a hellish relic in the form of a sacred buffalo skull. He used it to take control of / charm some Indian tribes, and intends to become the great chief himself, with mass slaughter in mind. However, not all Indian tribes fell under his power, so there were fights among them. Then, an enemy tribe's brave stole the skull from the sorcerer / shaman, and fled with it in the wilderness. The truth is that the skull being a powerful magical item cannot be simply smashed like a vulgar bone. The malevolent spirit that inhabits it would be released and eventually find its way into another item of the sorcerer. Hence, the brave has taken on a quest right into the Otherworld's Hunting Grounds where to get rid of the evil skull for good. The sorcerer / shaman is after him, but cannot rely on Indians now without the skull, and should better hire people who don't care for this kind of magical stuff. As such, he went after the brave accompanied by a bound demon that has taken the guise of... a hanging judge! However, even with his pet demon, the sorcerer still fears the brave, especially with the skull in his hands; reason for which he needs hired guns.

-- The night before the posse's departure for the hunt, a mysterious murder happens in the fort. The judge investigates, then quickly finds and hangs the murderer. The latter claims his innocence and doesn't seem dangerous at all, but has had several persons witness him kill the victim for no obvious reason. Nobody knows, and there is no clue left, that the murder was done by the demon under the guise of some innocent refugee. The demon / hanging judge couldn't resist but perform some evil in the fort (and temporarily increased the fear level by 1) before the group leaves the place...

-- The shaman, hanging judge and posse track the brave who stole the skull, into the wilderness. At some point there must be another opportunity for the hanging judge to appear cruel and merciless against some dubiously guilty individual, while letting some truly evil character go by unmolested.

-- Finally the group comes to a canyon during a storm. They see the brave ahead, going across the canyon walking on a thin natural bridge in the mist, and finally disappearing into a forest on the other side. There is a gate to the Otherworld here, but not one easy to use. When the posse arrives there is a lull in the storm, so they can clearly see no bridge and no forest on the other side. It's when the shaman tells the posse that they will have to go into the Otherworld, maybe into Hell. The gate can only materialize during a storm, and can only be used by people with a firm willingness to brave death and goes onto the almsot virtual bridge. This requires a Spirit check at -2, yet drinking a special potion can greatly help. When the storm comes back, the PCs can see outlines of the bridge and the forest through the rain, gloominess, and mist. Drinking the potion provided by the shaman will help them see better the spiritual world and bridge, but if they look behind their back they will see the hanging judge for what it truly is...

-- Then, once into the Otherworld the posse quickly finds the brave, who lies wounded into a tree or whatever. He warns the posse about the demon (which will then attack) and the sorcerer (who will try to flee). Then, the brave explains that when he entered the Otherworld, the skull became a living demon/buffalo, as here it regained its true existence. The demon/buffalo attacked the brave who nonetheless managed to take refuge in a tree. Now the demon/buffalo has gone away but will come back to hunt him. Also, the sorcerer, if having survived the posse, will try to find the beast and then come back after them all. The PCs must find the sorcerer, the demon/buffalo, and kill them.

-- Going back into the normal world requires appropriate mystical knowledge, or at least the brave or sorcerer still alive (and willing to help). Putting an end to the Indian troubles once back into the normal world, requires either the brave alive, or the sorcerer's head to show to the tribes he submitted. If neither are available, the troubles will eventually calm down and things return to normal, but after much sufferings and innocents' deaths.

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#31 Postby Turanil » Sun Jun 18, 2006 10:25 am

One about steam machines and weird science.

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THE RAIL BARON'S SECRET LAIR

-- The train of a minor railroad company has been attacked twice lately. Each time a safe weighing more than one ton and containing half a million of dollars was stolen. Also, each time all the passengers were slain, except for a teenager who hid and escaped the second attack. Back to the nearest town he told the sheriff, but also per chance recognised one of the bandits in a saloon. The sheriff arrested the bandit, but the latter was shortly thereafter found dead, and the teenager missing. Someone even tried to shoot the sheriff but failed.

-- The sheriff has no clues and cannot do anything outside of the town, but the posse may be interested in the hefty reward that will be given to those who will bring the money and bandits to justice. The adventure begins with investigations that should reveal that the heavy safes must have been carried away by an unknown train, certainly not by carriage across the wilderness. Then, more careful investigations may reveal that a dozen years ago, a mining company ordered loads of construction material (for mining, machines, and electricity) that were sent on this same railway. But then nobody ever heard of that company, and the material seemingly disappeared without anyone noticing. Eventually, hints and clues should lead the posse to the place where the safes and construction material must have disappeared: a hill between two canyons where the railroad passes.

-- When the rail company first dig a tunnel across the hill, a natural cavern network was found inside. The company's owner got the idea to use it for a secret lair of his own. So the place was converted into a complex of tunnels and rooms where mechanical experiments would be conducted. The water of the rivers in the canyons would be used to provide electricity. In the tunnel that goes across the hill, a switching way can lead a train into a secret side tunnel. However, all of this did cost a helluva lot of money. So, in the end, the company's owner on the brink of bankruptcy, resolved to steal the money that was conveyed in his trains on this railroad. However, for that he also had to kill all the train's passengers, so as to prevent anyone learning what really happened there. Yet, one passenger actually managed to survive and tell the sheriff of the nearest town. Fortunately, the company has eyes and ears in this town, but those intervened too late, so now the posse has come...

-- The remaining of the adventure is a dungeon delving through the underhill lair. There are machnies of all sorts, automatons and traps, as well as the bandits, etc.

-- Some points to consider: There is a scheming to make people believe the hill and environs are haunted by evil spirits hating that intruders go acros their territory (in the train). Some strange eerie lights and balls of lightning have been seen over the hill at night. Then, the train must have been attacked by supernatural beings for all the passengers were found dead strangely burned and scorched while nothing else in the train did burn or suffer from fire, and with an expression of utter fright frozen of their faces. It's because the bandits, maskerading as ghosts, used strange and improbable electricity weapons. But the teenager noticed a guy in the saloon looking strangely like one of those ghosts. He told the sheriff, but then disappeared before the sheriff could do anything useful. Lastly, there is a preacher in town who excite the fear of the population, speaking about Satan, etc. But this guy truly works for the company's owner. The latter intends to someday close the railway, and keep curious people at bay with such ghost sories. Of course there is nothing supernatural here, only use of weird science and machines.

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#32 Postby Turanil » Sun Jun 18, 2006 1:28 pm

This one origianlly was for a fantasy game, but I easily savaged it for DL:R...

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WOLFEN PEASANTS - ENCOUNTER

-- While travelling in the forest, the PCs notice a sturdy timber house, obviously inhabited by some people, given the noise that comes out of it. This house is home to a family of five persons, plus their pet wolf. Although they look like some trappers family at first sight, these people are in fact werewolves...

-- The GM/Marshall should come up with a motive for the PCs to approach the house. Maybe the posse is after some bandits or evil cultists; or maybe they just need shelter for the night, or information to find their way out of the forest. In any case, while approaching the house, a PC with farming knowledge who actively observes the place may notice this: there is no sign of farming around the house, so the inhabitants must find their food elsewhere in the forest (in fact, it's because the inhabitants only eat the flesh of their victims). A torough search would then reveal some buried corpse remains here and there, including some sheriff's (or ranger's) cadaver.

-- Outside of the house, a young boy is playing with a wolf. The wolf will growl toward the approaching posse. This will call out the father, who will come out of the house armed with a big shiny knife (which incidentally is a silver dagger, stolen to a former victim buried not far away). Then, the posse will meet with the other family members: mother, teenage girl, and granny. The teenage girl is hot and trying to seduce, while the granny is senile and look mean. One thing that will quickly become apparent, is that all of them are dumb and aggressive rednecks ready for abuse against each other.

-- The thing is, that the trappers/werewolves shouldn't attack all of a sudden without some roleplaying before. As such, while the PCs are there, some delicate situation will arise. This could be the young teenage girl trying to seduce a good-looking male PC, telling him that she wants to leave this "stinking place", which of course will arouse her father's anger, who will then accuse the PCs. Or worse, the father may be lustful for a good-looking female PC, in front of his wife who will be angered. All the while the granny cackles insanely, foaming at the mouth and looking mean. Let the posse try to handle the situation without bloodshed; but whatever they do, the rednecks become all the more aggressive. Then, when the players have had enough of it, the rednecks may take their werewolf shape and attack; beginning with the young boy who attacks in the back when nobody is paying attention to him.

-- Note that the father's silver dagger is there in case the PCs would have no silver weapons to use against the werewolves. However, this dagger will have to be taken from the father by force (grappling, etc.)...

-- Plot Hook: The werewolves could have some clues about a similar nearby evil. For example, there could be a bandit leader, deeper in the forest, who is also a werewolf (but more powerful). Or maybe the rednecks are members of an evil debased cult led by some evil shaman or satanist priest, deep in the forest. Otherwise, after defeating the werewolves, the posse could find the equipment (in the house) then the buried corpse, of the former rightful owner of the silver dager. It was a sheriff (or a ranger), and from info found in his equipment, the posse can learn where he came from. Bringing the new about him to the authorities, etc., could win some favor to the posse, and give them a motivation to travel to some place where the GM/Marshall has some adventure waiting.

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#33 Postby Turanil » Sun Jun 18, 2006 6:14 pm

Some info on saloons that may be of use in order to stuff them a little.

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:jack: OLD WEST SALOONS
(SOURCE: Saloons of the Wild West, Richard Erdoes, New York: Gramercy Books, 1997.)

Saloons existed for centuries, but it wasn’t until the 1840s that the term came into popular use. Tavern, alehouse, and taproom were commonly used before that time. By the 1850s, it had evolved into the typical false-fronted building swinging doors and carved bars. Four cities influenced the development of saloons. New Orleans was the gateway to Texas, as well as home to gamblers and soiled doves. St. Louis was the jumping off point for the fur trade and the overland trails. Chicago had a large brewing industry and shipped barroom equipment. San Francisco was the gateway to the gold fields. Saloons in these cities, and small towns too, filled a basic human need, which was to find someone else to talk to, to commiserate with about life’s problems. It was usually the first building built in a new town and the last one to crumble when a boom town became a ghost town.

Saloons existed in America virtually since the first settlements on the east coast. Sailing ships brought large supplies of liquor from England. These places served the same purpose as the western saloon, but it was a much more respectable place then. So much so that it wasn’t uncommon to see women as tavern owners and barkeepers. The men were frequently mayors, postmasters, or some other respected member of the town. Clergymen of all types felt that partaking was a necessary part of life. They drank applejack, rum, brandy, whiskey, hot toddies, and beer, though bartenders were capable of mixing drinks. It was also thought to be healthful to imbibe in hard liquor.

After the Revolutionary War was over, adventurers started heading west. Virginians heading west into Kentucky and Tennessee put a new face on the western saloon. They were hard drinkers, loved to play cards, and enjoyed female companionship. The next generation of saloons began to cater to them. It became common to drink whiskey, even for breakfast. As people pushed even further west, even more taverns sprang up, because places to rest and have a drink were few and far between and even ranches, always hospitable to travelers, could be 50 miles apart.

The first place to be called a saloon was Brown’s saloon, established in 1822 at a place later known as Brown’s Hole near the Wyoming-Colorado-Utah border. The big fur trade rendezvous took place in this area and Brown made a fortune selling the traders’ liquor. When the miners came out to California, Colorado, and Montana, saloons followed them. Even riverboats on western rivers carried large quantities of liquor for travelers. In towns so new people were still living in tents, peddlers sold their whiskey right out of their wagons.

Early western saloons could take many different forms. Some were sod houses in areas where wood was scarce. One old saloon in San Francisco occupied a hull of an old sailing ship. Others were dug into the side of a hill. Eventually, saloons got more substantial and were often the biggest and most impressive building in town. As they got more popular, their euphemisms changed to more colorful terms such as watering trough, bughouse, shebang, cantina, grogshop, and gin mill.

The saloons had a few things in common such as a wooden sidewalk and a hitching rail to tie up the horses. There was often a livery adjacent to or behind the saloon. Most had the usual swinging doors, often embellished with frosted glass. The windows were often covered with grills or posters to block the view of the inside. They were usually longer than wide. The bars were hand-sculpted in oak or mahogany or in the really ritzy places, walnut. The bars frequently had towels hanging in several locations so customers could wipe foam from their beards and moustaches. A brass rail lined the bottom of the bar so cowpokes could put up their feet. Spittoons were kept handy as many old west customers needed a place to spit their tobacco. A mirror usually lined the wall behind the bar and brightly labeled bottles were lined up against it. There wasn’t much lighting, illumination often provided by candles or coal oil lamps. Saloons in bigger cities quickly switched to gas lights when they became available. A pot belly stove provided the heat.

Many saloons had the only piano in town and it was much beloved by the patrons. Another favorite feature was the “back room” where men could bell up for a game of poker or billiards. The decorations varied from place to place but reflected the clientele. For example, if the majority of the customers were cowhands, steer horns, spurs, saddles, and the like would adorn the walls. There was often some kind of large painting behind the bar, often a nude. A favorite painting was “Old Yellow Hair,” a picture of Custer’s Last Stand. Sometimes the saloon was also the only place in town where a man could get a haircut and a shave.

The typical bartender was the best-dressed man in the house with bright-white shirt and fancy vest. His hair was perfectly groomed and his mustache perfectly waxed. If it was a fancy place, the bartender usually sported some type of jewelry like a fancy pinky ring or a gold watch. He was always armed with at least a knife if not a pistol or shotgun. He was often called upon to mediate disputes. This was in his best interests as he needed to protect his expensive furniture from destruction by drunken cowboys. Many didn’t have to serve anything fancy. In fact, he might only have to hand a cowboy a bottle and a glass and let him do his own pouring. Many actually served mixed drinks, especially in the bigger cities and large boom towns. Many used generous servings of ice and bitters to disguise poor quality drinks. He often served as a fire alarm too, as he would be the only sober man awake late at night when fires tended to break out. He would run up the street, shooting his gun, to get the attention of the firefighters.

People of all nationalities frequented these bars, mainly men. French, German, Swiss, Arabian, and many others went to saloons as much to socialize as to drink. Some bars tended to be “all-German” or “all-Italian,” or other nationality, where ethnic groups could gather with their own kind. For the most part Indians were not allowed in saloons. Black men were more tolerated in the early days of saloons, but then only if he was a noted gambler or bad man.

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#34 Postby Turanil » Sun Jun 18, 2006 6:58 pm

Here is a new that a previously unknown type of dinosaur resembling dragons has been found in South Dakota. It gave me some adventure idea.

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COW-BOYS & DRAGONS

-- Several teenage girls and young women have disappeared lately, never to be seen again. It seems that at least two were kidnapped, but nobody asked for money to give them back. Some say Indians were involved in the kidnappings, but this is false (or maybe the kidnappers were disguised as Indians to mislead investigations). In any case, the posse is called upon to investigate...

-- The reason for these kidnappings was to provide virgin maidens to a dragon that resides in the deep of a mine. As such, the posse should eventually find the old mine and battle a dragon of legends...

-- Now this is weird west, not King Arthur's Albion. What truly happened is that a prospector with arcane knowledge, found the complete fossil of a dinosaur in a bed of ghost rock. This was a "dracorex hogwartsia", whose millions of years spent in the ghost rock bed impregnated with power and magic. The prospector became obsessed with the thing, and finally found a way to call it back. Using some arcane ritual of his own design on the magically impregnated fossil, enabled the prospector to bring it back to life. But then, mistaking it for a dragon, the prospector believed it should be fed with virgin maiden, where normal animal flesh would have been enough... if only the thing needed to be fed. In fact it's a magical creation, and if killed, it will revert back to a fossil good to go to the nearest museum.

-- There is no treasure of gold in the "dragon" cave, but a good amount of ghost rock. Some kidnapped women are still kept there, alive and terrified. They weren't given to the "dragon" as food, as the prospector discovered they weren't virgin as he had believed in the first place. These two women will tell the posse enough clues so they understand it really was the fossil of a dinosaur brought back to life through black magic, rather than a real dragon.

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#35 Postby Turanil » Wed Aug 16, 2006 5:44 am

Bump... :1drooling3:
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#36 Postby Clint » Wed Aug 16, 2006 8:48 am

Do I have two votes to put on poll on this thread, so it doesn't get deleted by the auto-cull?
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#37 Postby dap6000 » Wed Aug 16, 2006 10:13 am

Yes please.

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#38 Postby Noshrok Grimskull » Wed Aug 16, 2006 11:57 am

2. vote. Poll away.
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#39 Postby Turanil » Sat Sep 02, 2006 8:45 am

Vote! Poll indeed, thanks!

And now a map of the town of Deadwood. Enjoy!
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#40 Postby cpt_machine » Mon Sep 04, 2006 7:05 pm

Dead Crago

The posse have gotten onto a train for a minor rail line and the post cart is filled with coffins which acording to the paperwork is the corpses of solider in the civil war to be sent home.

Bandits will attack the train and the posse will be forced to defend itself. The blood of the innocent and the guilty will flow freely, nothing too odd so far.

The smell of blood will 're-animate' the corpses who are zombies put in a state of sleep by their creator. The zombies will flood across the train killing both bandits, innocents and even the players. Those they kill will get up and kill... you get the point (watch dawn of the dead (orignal) if you dont)

A semi-mad priest with some blessed powers will approch the posse and inform them that he has been trying to track down where these creatures were going, all he knows is that they were not just sent, they were order. He is unable to fight to defend himself but can bless the bullet in the guns of each of the posse if needed. When its starts to seem bad and the posse runs out of bullets they will hear a hissing sound behind them. The priest will be stood before them, a bundle of dynomite in each hand and tells the players he must stop this swarm of evil and so long as they stay on the train he can, he impores the group to flee off the train before its explodes and derails taking him and the zombies with him.

(this idea was taken from the first volume of the fantastic werid west manga called 'Priest', buy it now...)


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